• Highheels

    Why you don’t have to be a boss lady to do a career

    “I don’t like to turn into a stereotype boss lady”, my mentee sighs. “That is not me. And I feel, I have to become such a person to do a career.” This conversation happened over 10 years ago – and it stuck with me. Why do people – and mostly women – believe that it is necessary to turn into something that they are not in order to achieve an undefined thing like ‘a career’!? I guess, it has a lot to do with role models. Women who did their careers in the 90s and early 00s were often quite similar to one another – leading to a limited variety…

  • Highheels

    How my mindset influences my skillset

    “I am such a looser.” “Everyone else gets the tasks done – but I am again running detours.” “Of course, this bad luck happened to me. As always.” Do you know any of this negative self talk? If you ever say these sentences aloud, chances are high that your inner talk is filled with messages of self-doubt. Have you ever wondered why you think this way? Our brain is amazing: once we start thinking certain messages, our brain learns that we need this information and builds its network accordingly. It gives us quick access to certain thoughts until they become routines and we need less energy to access them. Unfortunately,…

  • Boots

    Your detours write history

    Every good storyline evolves around a person who needs to overcome challenges – a big loss, an unfortunate turn in life, a challenge too big to overcome alone. We get intrigued by those kind of stories and suffer with the main cast until the (happy) end. Yet, in our own lives, we are quite upset once even a single little step doesn’t work – the delayed promotion, the reduced bonus, the unfair feedback. In movies, we can acknowledge how obstacles strengthen the hero of the story. In our own lives, we cannot even accept a little hurdle. We feel that the missed chance to get to the one great university…

  • Highheels

    Your passion is welcome at work

    “Are my passions relevant for my job?” “What if Excel isn’t my hobby?” “What does it mean to bring my whole self to my workplace?” Maybe you are familiar with those questions. Since school we get taught that there are topics for which we are graded – and only these topics seem relevant for getting a job. Consequently, we devide our life in school and hobbies – and later in life in work and hobbies. Unfortunately, during this process we miss to find out which passions actually drive us. We somehow feel unfulfilled in our day-to-day job but we cannot articulate where the reason is. Hence, many people start questioning…

  • Highheels

    What should I do next?

    „What should I do next?“, the applicant asks. „What does my CV need?“ Although I highly value that people want to get good degrees and the entry ticket into certain jobs, I am wondering whether these are the wise questions to ask!? Because ‚your CV‘ is a reflection of your life and the time you spent in certain tasks (job, univeristy, family). And I am wondering whether ‚someone‘ should tell you how to spend your life. And even if it might be smart to ask good mentors for advice, the question must be asked when you will stop asking ‚what does my CV need‘? What isn’t transparent to students and…

  • Highheels

    Career (un)planned!?

    Talking to business people, you realize quickly that most people have started their careers with some sort of plan. You can see it in their CVs, too: elite university, year abroad, the right internships But are these colleagues the most inspiring ones? When I recall the happiest and most inspiring leaders and colleagues, they all had one thing in common: some sort of unpredictability crossed their life that led them to their current position. They took their chances when they had the option: the musician who went into consulting; the consultant who took a sabbatical and biked through african countries; the doctor who started a career in business coaching. They…

  • Boots,  Highheels

    Attention: trap ahead!

    “I have sooooooo much to do.” I would love to get a dollar each time I hear this sentence of people in leadership roles. Of course I get it: asside from people really having a lot to do, this sentence is a certain way of communicating a level of importance . But as a coach, I’m a bit concerned that a leader is telling this story to himself/herself. Because let’s face it: you are paid for having ‘so much to do’. This is not even your leadership role. Here is what concerns me: If you are telling people around you that you are already packed with topics, you won’t get…

  • Boots,  Highheels

    What will last?

    Recently I was hit by a picture on social media: a man being honored by his company for his 85th aniversary within the firm – he being 100 years old, sitting on his desk with a certificate smiling into the camera. Although I get the beauty of the value ‘loyalty’, this picture moved loyalty to a certain level of absurdity. Absurdity because you could see that his tasks were done at a desk – but all the colleagues and people who got to know him along the way were missing. If you look back at the years, you have been working so far: What do you remember? There might have…

  • Highheels

    Leadership is a talent

    “I know how to lead a team well.” “I can motivate people to reach a common goal.” “I can write a plan and make it happen.” – … “but this is nothing special. It is just what I do, right?” When I talk to people about their skills and talents, they often don’t get their unique gifting. For them it feels so natural what they are doing that they do not even consider it a talent. Leading a team, structuring a topic, giving people advice how to grow in their talents – it all feels so normal to them that they have a hard time to realize that these habits…

  • Highheels

    “All my team meetings are crap”

    She is so disappointed. Although there is a common vision and the team members like each other, another team meeting went down the line without people contributing or a fruitful discussion. Stress is high these days and time is precious. It makes it even worse that the time of the team meeting doesn’t seem to be used well. She sighs. What is going wrong? I am asking, whether I might share my perspective. She nodds. “Do you remember coming on very last minute into the meeting?” – yes, she admits. There are always many topics and she always runs into the meeting in the last moment or sometimes late. Although…